top of page
Inside View 1 for PLOT RESAMPLED JPEG_ed

Interior view

Interior view

Life and Death of a Water Filter

Filter diagram.jpg

Filter diagram

Exploded axon.jpg

Exploded axonometric

Pool View for PLOT RESAMPLED SMALL.jpg

Interior view

overall V2.jpg

Sectional model

Looking Up for PLOT RESAMPLES SMALL.jpg

Interior view

Academic Work

Columbia GSAPP 2018

Instructor Lindy Roy, Roy Studio

Site: Brooklyn, NY

With the increase in size of cargo ships, the Brooklyn Navy Yards’ dry docks became obsolete. This project uses the pumping system already in place in the dry docks to create a mycelium water filter for the East River. 


In this application, mycelium has a closed carbon cycle. The filter grows rapidly and doesn’t generate any waste. Besides, the mycelium can utilize waste generated by other other manufactures in the Brooklyn Navy Yards as source of nutrition and substrate for growth, adding an extra layer of local benefit.
Considering that light stops the growth of mycelium, light modulators are placed to sculpt the hanging filters in a canyon-like manner, creating open space for public use. 


This adds an educational component to the system, as it allows the public to engage with this biotechnological water filter and showcases an opportunity to harvest environmental and social benefit from what is now obsolete infrastructure. 


The environmental infrastructure is calibrated by light, which comes into play to kill architecture and allow it to live in other ways.

bottom of page